Isamu Noguchi

1.895

Coffee Table

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Product Description

Isamu Noguchi

Coffee Table

Table top of heavy glass with rounded edges, base made of solid maple with lacquer finish

H: 40cm  L:128cm  D:93cm

glass signed

Vitra, Switzerland, circa 1990

In creating his design for the Coffee Table, in 1944, Isamu Noguchi translated the aesthetic of his sculptural works into a piece of furniture with distinctive organic forms. Presumably for this reason, Noguchi regarded the table as his best furniture design.

Isamu Noguchi

Isamu Noguchi (1904-1988) was born in Los Angeles, son of  a Japanese poet who was acclaimed in the United States, and an American writer who edited much of Noguchi's work. Noguchi was an artist and landscape architect whose artistic career spanned six decades, from the 1920s onward. He studied at Columbia University and the Leonardo da Vinci Art School. He subsequently established his first independent studio and received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1927. Noguchi became an assistant to Constantin Brancusi in Paris and presented his first solo exhibition in New York. After studying brush drawing in China, he travelled to Japan to work with clay under the master potter Jinmatsu Uno. Known for his sculpture and public works, Noguchi also designed stage sets for various Martha Graham productions, and several mass-produced lamps and furniture pieces, some of which are still manufactured and sold. In 1947, Noguchi began a collaboration with the Herman Miller company, when he joined with George Nelson, Paul László and Charles Eames to produce a catalog containing what is often considered to be the most influential body of modern furniture ever produced, including the iconic Noguchi table which remains in production today. His experiences living and working in different cultural circles are reflected in Isamu Noguchi's work as an artist. He is considered a universal talent with a creative oeuvre that went beyond sculpture to encompass stage sets, furniture, lighting, interiors as well as outdoor plazas and gardens. His sculptural style is indebted to a vocabulary of organic forms and exerted a sustained influence on the design of the 1950s. His work lives on around the world and at the Noguchi Museum in New York City.